Sep 07, 2021

Diversifying the Nursing Workforce: Mentoring for Student Retention and NCLEX Success at American Indian/Alaska Native-serving Institutions

September 16, 2021

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

Diversifying the Nursing Workforce is a two-day workshop for nursing faculty on mentorship, designed to increase diversity in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) nursing workforce. Co-hosted by the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of AARP Foundation, AARP, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and by the National Alaska Native American Indian Nurses Association, the Office of Minority Health and Indian Health Services at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service, the sessions are intended to increase student retention, graduation, and first-time pass rates on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).

The goal is to achieve health equity by increasing the diversity of the nursing workforce.

Goals for Participants

  • Guide faculty on culturally responsive approaches for engaging and mentoring AI/AN students, as well as offer teaching and learning strategies for faculty.
  • Examine current evidence-based mentoring models that increase student retention and academic success.
  • Identify and develop a mentoring model and program reflecting the unique landscape and context of participating nursing schools.
  • Facilitate collaborative relationships with the Campaign for Action’s state-based coalitions and professional organizations to support the implementation of mentoring programs at AI/AN schools of nursing.
  • Identify, examine, and delineate strategies to engage stakeholders to support the implementation of the mentoring plan developed during the workshop.

Expected Outcomes for Participating AI/AN Institutions/Departments of Nursing

  • Develop a shared community to support mentoring and academic success of students.
  • Collaborate with the Campaign’s state-based coalitions to initiate or update program work to diversify the nursing workforce in your state.
  • Develop partnerships with the Campaign and other individuals with expertise in issues of diversity and inclusion.
  • Receive technical assistance from the Campaign, Office of Minority Health and Indian Health Services.
  • Initiate or continue to build collaborative relationships with professional nursing and other organizations whose members can serve as mentors and allies in program implementation.

September 16 Pre-Meeting Presentations


Dimension 1: Caring 

Presented by: Regina Eddie, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Northern Arizona University and Diversity Adviser, Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action

Dimension Objectives:

  • Assess culturally responsive practices relevant AI/AN students’ at an institution, program and faculty levels.
  • Describe mentoring and academic success.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Dimension 2: Traditions 

Presented by: Beverly Warne, MSN, RN, Instructor, Mentor and Coordinator, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University

Dimension Objectives:

  • Explain how knowledge of tradition would enhance the mentoring process with Native American nursing students.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Dimension 3: Respect 

Presented by: Sandy Littlejohn, MA, BSN, RN, President, National Alaska Native American Indian Nurses Association, Inc.

Dimension Objectives:

  • Describe ways in which respect is shown within the AI/AN population.
  • Identify one item in the Mentor Awareness Continuum for self-learning to increase knowledge of AI/AN culture.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Dimension 4: Connections 

Presented by: Lisa Martin, PhD, RN, FAAN, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Minnesota and Diversity Adviser, Campaign for Action

Dimension Objectives:

  • Describe the importance and impact of AI/AN mentee/s relationships in their circle and how these relationships support the mentee/s academic progress.
  • State two steps involved in developing the mentoring relationship towards mutually understood goals or agreements.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


September 17, 2021 Pre-Meeting Presentations 


Dimension 5: Holism/Holistic 

Presented by: Rachel Mack, PhD, DNP, APRN, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Frontier Nursing University

Dimension Objectives:

  • Review Social Determinants of Health tool to assist in developing a shared community to support mentoring and academic success of students.
  • Review Messaging template and examples to improve the academic success of students.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Dimension 6: Trust 

Presented by: Lisa Martin

Dimension Objectives:

  • Describe three ways that trust contributes to the mentoring relationship and three ways to develop trust.
  • Describe the role of evaluation in closing the mentoring relationship.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Dimension 7: Spirituality  

Presented by: Beverly Warne

Dimension Objectives:

  • Describe how spiritual lifeways can serve as retention tools for Native American nursing students.
  • Describe how spiritual ceremony can be effective with a feeling of belonging for Native American nursing students.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


American Indian and Alaska Native Students Practice, Manage, and Lead as Nurses in Indian Country: Celebrating 20 years of the Caring for Our Own Program

Live Recorded Presentation

Presented by: Laura Larsson, PhD, MPH, RN, Professor, College of Nursing and Director, Caring for Our Own Program (CO-OP), Montana State University

Module Objectives:

  1. Describe the Caring for Our Own Program and it’s collaboration with the Montana Action Coalition.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Overview: Grant Programs, Funding, and Recommendations

Live Recorded Presentation

Presented by: Tara Spencer, MS, RN, Chief Nursing Education and Practice Branch Division of Nursing and Public Health.

Module Objectives:

  1. Review HRSA funding opportunities.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Exploring Ways to Address Microaggressions to Promote Inclusion

Live Recorded Presentation

Presented by: Kupiri “Piri” Ackerman-Barger, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean of Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Clinical Professor, University of California Davis Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

Module Objectives:

  1. Identify the role of each member involved in the microaggression [recipient, source, and bystander(s)].
  2. Discuss the nature of the microaggression including how it could have hurtful impact on the recipient(s), bystanders, and/or community.
  3. Discuss responses from each member involved in the interaction that could build inclusive excellence, repair and re-establish relationships, and restore or protect reputations.

Resource:

PowerPoint Presentation


Additional Resources

AIAN Nursing Education Curriculum

Activities & Resources


 

Training hosted by: